Balinese massage is form of traditional Indonesian massage which combines a range of techniques including massage, acupressure, reflexology, and aromatherapy, all into one session. Often used for relaxation, this type of massage can also help loosen muscles and ease pain.

This style of massage combines influences from a number of different cultures, including China and India. In particular, it is often linked to Ayurveda, an Indian holistic medical system which emphasises bringing the body into balance. A particular aim of Balinese massage is a relaxed state of mind; to accomplish this, your practitioner may knead or fold the skin to promote the flow of blood, oxygen, and energy throughout the body.

Balinese is a form of deep massage and is designed to work almost every muscle in the body, using a variety techniques, including acupressure movements, such as press point and palm pressure, and standard massage techniques like sliding, long exploration, short exploration, and kneading. This massage is not a delicate one, and can typically be felt deep in the muscles.

One element of a Balinese massage is acupressure, in which firm pressure is applied to specific points on the body. This pressure helps to stimulate the body’s ability to heal itself. Acupressure may also help to promote blood flow, relieve pain, and relax tension.

Similarly, reflexology, which involves putting pressure on certain parts of the body (specifically, the feet, hands, and ears) may be used in Balinese massage. These body parts are believed to have points that correspond to various organs and body systems; by applying pressure to these reflex points, problems with those organs or a person’s general health may be addressed. The practitioner is trained to work on a client from both the outside and the inside.

Essential oils are a key part of a Balinese massage. These oils are usually strongly scented, and they serve both to help relax the muscles and soothe the mind. A variety of oils are used; commonly jasmine, rose, and sandalwood, while more exotic oils may include cempaka, sandat, and frangipani. To address a specific complaint, the practitioner may use a warm oil with an infusion of, for example, lemongrass, cloves, or ginger.